[Tu-tu vertu Vortex] – Irina Sigitova

3500 

Sigitova uses lines and whirlpools in her works ‘Tu-tu vertu vortex’ to illustrate the beauty of the female form. This ‘quilling’ technique adds a 3-dimensional quality to the work, making it appear to be alive, moving, and fluid. The body is an intricate flow of energy and vibrations, not unlike the ideas in theoretical physics that reality is made up of infinitesimal vibrating strings, smaller than atoms, electrons or quarks. According to this string theory, the vibrating strings produce effects that can be observed in everything from particle physics to gravity itself, thus promoting the ‘theory of everything’. If we can connect general relativity with quantum mechanics by using string theory, we may be able to discover the secrets of the universe. Perhaps we can even discover the secrets of women and what makes them such glorious beings.

• About artist: Irina Sigitova

ORIGINAL PAINTING FOR SELL

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Description

Application of a variety of lines and whirlpools forming the contours of smooth female lines.

String theory is the idea in theoretical physics that reality is made up of infinitesimal vibrating strings, smaller than atoms, electrons or quarks. According to this theory, as the strings vibrate, twist and fold, they produce effects in many, tiny dimensions that humans interpret as everything from particle physics to large-scale phenomena like gravity.

String theory has been held up as a possible “theory of everything,” a single framework that could unite general relativity and quantum mechanics, two theories that underlie almost all of modern physics. While quantum mechanics does very well in describing the behavior of very small things and general relativity works well to explain how very large things happen in the universe, they don’t play nicely together. Some scientists think (or thought) that string theory could resolve the conundrums between the two, conquering one of the major remaining unsolved problems of physics.

But after string theory gained prominence in the late 1960s and ’70s, its popularity among theoretical physicists fluctuated, according to a lecture by California Institute of Technology physicist John Schwarz, widely considered one of the founders of string theory. After countless papers, conferences and dry-erase markers, the breathtaking breakthrough many once hoped for seems further away than ever.

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